1951 General Motors LeSabre Concept

1951 General Motors LeSabre Concept
No company put out more fascinating concept automobiles in the decades than General Motors, in enormous part acknowledgments to GM design leader Harley Earl, who blinded the world in 1951 with the GM classic LeSabre. The LeSabre, a name not yet thought with Buick, caught the dawning airplane Age from every space, beginning with the protuberant venue opening that concealed dual headlights. Its dissimilar, fuselage like top body contours moved all the route to its afterburner like venue taillamp, all lied by debased and beamy barriers and stabilizers growing from its portable formations. The latter theme acted to be the generation. The LeSabre was a runner, too, energy by a 335-hp aluminum powered V-8 with a rear-attached automatic transaxle.

But unlike most classic concept automobiles that followed, the LeSabre was no trailer queen. Earl used it as his normal day ride for a few years, ultimately moving 45,000 miles on it. Tough public reaction to the LeSabre aided persuade GM to include concept automobiles in its well-kown Motorama car shows of the 1950s.